Part 2

On the future

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Throughout American history, there have been two general foreign policy eras: From the founding of the country until WWI the US primarily pursued isolationism and unilateralism, then there was a transition period until WWII, and since then the US has tended more towards globalism and multilateralism. This categorization is certainly overgeneralized as different presidential administrations, congresses, and situations have called for different policies that do not perfectly fit into these two categories, but I believe it is still a useful perspective with which to understand and plan for the foreign policy of the twenty-first century.

Since the end of the…


Part 1

On the rise of liberal idealism

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While the historical consensus may be that President Woodrow Wilson’s foreign policy after the end of the First World War was a failure and that President Harry Truman’s foreign policy after the end of the Second World War was a success, and while I don’t disagree with that broad assessment, for the purposes of this essay I believe it is important to look at Wilson’s foreign policy from two angles: that of ideas and implementation.

The implementation of Wilson’s ideas — “peace without victory” (Kaufman 48), a world “safe for democracy” (49), his list of Fourteen-Points to design the post-war…


The dilemma of nuclear strategy

Source

There are two primary perspectives on nuclear strategy, Mutually Assured Destruction Theory and Nuclear Utilization Theories (MAD and NUTS). These theories are fundamentally different in the ways they view nuclear weapons, warfare, security, and, specifically, questions around escalation dominance — whether it is achievable, or if it is even desirable to achieve.

The reasons for these differences come down to acceptance or rejection of what is known as the Nuclear Revolution, a number of implications stemming from the observation that nukes are utterly incomparable to conventional weapons. MAD accepts the Nuclear Revolution and has tended to be the US’s preferred…


A Petition to the People, by the People, for the People of the United States

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Flag_of_the_United_States.svg

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness — That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed . . .

This is the primary AMERICAN SOCIAL CONTRACT, an agreement between citizens and government: citizens give government power and government secures the rights of citizens. However, as they may be construed, the self-evident truths illuminated within this DECLARATION are not merely political…


An Open Letter

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Imagine, if you can, a world where the Right controls most of the major cultural institutions of the country. Think Hollywood, the news, social media, education, sports, etc. Maybe you already think they do and think they should control them less. In such a case, try imagining your side wins the cultural battle and takes over these institutions, but then they are taken back by the Right. Then, imagine the Right wins a massive election and takes control of the House of Representatives, the Senate, and the Presidency.

Now, think about all that power. They have so much influence over…


For Dummies

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  1. Those who use violence to try and bring about social change are political radicals. BLM, Antifa, the Alt-Right, and what I will term Radical Trumpsters see violence as a valid means to achieve their particular ends. It doesn’t matter what their ends are because even they don’t see them as valid enough, or their arguments for them as strong enough, to stand up in the marketplace of ideas. Instead of convincing people they have to rely on coercing people. Instead of the democratic process they desire tyrannical control. Therefore, instead of freedom they deserve prison.
  2. Those who excuse rioters from…


And How to Think About Preserving It

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The Freedom House research institute claims that the past fourteen years, 2005–2019, has been marked by a continuous democratic decline; that is, each year there were more countries falling to lower freedom scores than there were countries that improved. While democracies still make up a majority of the world’s nations, which wasn’t the case just a few decades ago, the consistency of this decline is worrying.

This essay will outline some theories of democratization as potential reasons for its decreasing success as well as examine case studies of particular countries to showcase the points of these theories. It will then…


An Argument for Secession

The unofficial seal of the Commission on Presidential Debates reading, “THE UNION AND THE CONSTITUTION FOREVER,” hangs above the stage of the first presidential debate of 2016 at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York. Photo by Brian Allen, Voice of America (Public Domain).

With the radical left attempting to destroy most of what makes America good, political division is growing and the secession of part of the country is becoming more and more likely.

I certainly do not hope for this outcome and believe everything should be done to prevent it, but if there comes a choice between transforming America into the Orwellian dystopia of the radical left or ending the Union that has lasted for so long and survived so much, I’d have to choose the latter.

Not only do I believe this choice would be the lesser of the two evils…


Belief, Debate, War, Voting, and Education.

My own design

These are the essays I’ve written that I believe present the best arguments on philosophical and political topics. Feel free to disagree with that assessment, and I will feel free to tell you why you’re wrong :)

The Triangle of Belief

Tying Philosophy to Politics

Tyler Piteo-Tarpy

Essayist, poet, screenwriter, and comer upper of weird ideas. My main focus will be on politics and philosophy but when I get bored, I’ll write something else.

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